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Loved Twice Grows

The 2011 Threads of Hope–winning nonprofit has a new headquarters to clothe more babies, thanks to coverage and donations.



Photo by Shaun Fenn

The last time Diablo checked in with Lisa Klein, founder of Loved Twice, she was a 2011 Threads of Hope award recipient, honored for her time spent collecting baby clothes to be distributed to those in need. With roughly 400 local volunteers in her corner, thousands of pounds of donated clothing were stored and sorted in the basement of her home.


Shortly after the Threads of Hope feature was released, Klein received a matching grant—one that would provide half of the money needed for a two-year lease of a new Loved Twice location. Through coverage in Diablo and O, The Oprah Magazine, as well as help from the Dean and Margaret Lesher Foundation of Walnut Creek, Klein was able to raise the matching funds and move into a 1,000-square-foot facility in May.

“I always thought I wanted a warehouse space, but being in a big, concrete, cold warehouse with big racks—it wasn’t part of our way,” Klein says. “The headquarters is definitely too beautiful to call a warehouse. It’s truly special.”

Courtesy of Loved TwiceNo longer is her basement a makeshift storage facility, as the new location, voluntarily designed and remodeled by Oakland’s Canyon Design Build free of charge, provides the space necessary for Klein and volunteers to work efficiently, hold sorting parties, and get as much baby clothing as possible out to social service agencies in the area.

“It’s a comforting place where volunteers can come with their kids and they can sort and they can feel good about what they did that day: box clothes for newborns in need,” Klein says.

The next step for Loved Twice is to raise enough funding to hire a program coordinator to help organize volunteers and distribution, as Klein is the only full-time staff member.

Despite this lack of full-time staff, Loved Twice is going national, with branches run by volunteers popping up across the country. These are simply people who read about Loved Twice, held their own sorting parties or clothing drives using the instructions on the nonprofit's website, and found they were dedicated enough to continue.

“Not only are we helping Bay Area newborns in need,” Klein says. “I think the success of the Threads of Hope award brought Loved Twice to a bigger, national level.”

With a big move and bigger plans still, Klein still always goes back to Loved Twice’s ultimate goal: clothing babies.

"I am ready and passionate to do more," she says. "Clearly, I have the passion, and it’s not going anywhere.”

To learn more about Loved Twice, check out the 2011 Threads of Hope feature on Lisa Klein.