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The List: May

Lance Armstrong, ballet, farm-fresh cherries, and other goodies that should be on your radar this month.


Published:

Ashraf

Comedy

Dana Carvey
(May 6) The comic legend brings his cache of characters to Walnut Creek’s Lesher Center for the Arts for a one-nighter, benefiting HomeAid Northern California. lesherartscenter.org.

Food

Farmers market
(May 6) Lafayette’s first permanent seasonal farmers market debuts this month and runs through September, with farm-fresh produce in Plaza Park 4–8 p.m. every Thursday. cccfm.org.

DanceCourtesy of Dana Carvey

Diablo Ballet
(May 7–8) This interactive Inside the Dancer’s Studio performance at Walnut Creek’s Shadelands Art Center concludes with a Q&A with dancers. diabloballet.org.

Books

Roddy Doyle
(May 8) Coming to Danville via Ireland, Booker Prize–winning author Roddy Doyle will read from his new novel The Dead Republic at Rakestraw Books. rakestrawbooks.com.

Sports

Lance Armstrong
(May 19) Catch a glimpse of the seven-time Tour de France champ as he rides through downtown Livermore on leg four of the Amgen Tour of California. amgentourofcalifornia.com.

Film

Courtesy of Bedford Gallery; American Graffiti
(May 22) Watch George Lucas’ breakthrough movie at the Orinda Theatre as part of the monthly Classic Film Series. Star Cindy Williams will participate in a Q&A following each of the three screenings. caiff.org.

Family Fun

Art & Wind Festival
(May 30–31) Head to San Ramon’s Central Park for hundreds of arts and crafts booths, live entertainment, kite making, and an early-morning hot air balloon launch on May 31. ci.san-ramon.ca.us.

Art

The Dutch Impressionists
(Through June 27) This Bedford Gallery exhibit proves that Impressionism wasn’t limited to France, with landscapes and depictions of rural life from the Netherlands. bedfordgallery.org.

Behind the ScenesCourtesy of Roddy Doyle;

Roddy Doyle on the difference between writing for adults and kids:

“I have written eight books for adults and six for kids. When I’m writing for adults, I don’t think about who will read it: A 25-year-old is the same as a 75-year-old. But for children, I think of a very specific child and age to write for. I have written books for my kids and halfway through realized that they’ve already outgrown the story. So I write children’s books much faster, in hopes that the child will still like it when I’m done.”

—P.C.

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